Democratic Party Debates, Christian Charity, Baseball, and the End of June

The first Democratic Party presidential nominee debates took place this week. While there were very few mentions of legitimate policy or courses of action, the debates were entertaining and did provide insight into the field. While her and I differ in both spiritual beliefs and lots of political policy, I found Tulsi Gabbard to be the most impressive candidate in the field. She was quite polished and impressive as a speaker. Despite an average or below average performance, I still think the former vice president is the frontrunner. FiveThirtyEight published a fascinating piece featuring charts that summarized debate statistics. In a NYT opinion piece, Bret Stephens highlighted many of the flaws within the party that were apparent in the debates. These included candidates speaking in Spanish, aiming to take away private insurance but give free health insurance to undocumented immigrants, and supporting social programs that cost trillions and trillions of dollars. I can’t wait until the field narrows to just five or so candidates; the debates will be considerably more interesting. And speaking of political issues…

There was a recent report about how children are being treated at the border in detainment centers, which led to Vice President Pence saying there needed to be a change, as well as outcries from those of all political allegiances. Dr. Russell Moore tweeted, “The reports of the conditions for migrant children at the border should shock all of our consciences. Those created in the image of God should be treated with dignity and compassion, especially those seeking refuge from violence back home. We can do better than this.” Great comment on how everyone is made in the Imago Dei, though I will acknowledge how tricky the border situation is and how finding a solution is so difficult. At the very least, church leaders and members should be compelled when they hear of these things to get engaged and help out, as we are to serve people of all nations and make disciples of all nations. Though Dr. Jack Graham and Dr. Moore differ considerably in their views on how faith and politics intersect, Graham even commented on how his church, Prestonwood, does considerable work and ministry down south at the border. However, Jerry Falwell, Jr.’s comment was uncalled for, as he replied to Moore’s tweet, “Who are you @drmoore ? Have you ever made a payroll? Have you ever built an organization of any type from scratch? What gives you authority to speak on any issue? I’m being serious. You’re nothing but an employee- a bureaucrat.” Christians are going to differ on so many issues, whether they be political, or about complementarianism, or about God’s sovereignty and human responsibility. But we’re all united under the banner of the gospel, which compels us toward charitable and fruitful conversation, not quarrelsome harshness (2 Tim. 2:22-26).

The college baseball season came to a close this past week as well, with Vanderbilt besting Michigan in three games to take the title. Vandy’s freshman Kumar Rocker is incredibly good. It’s a wonder he didn’t get drafted high last year. I remember when he left the Perfect Game Jr. National Showcase and the National Showcase the following year as the clear number one prospect in the 2018 high school class. Vanderbilt got a good one. 

With the start of July approaching, it is crazy to think that the summer is halfway over. It feels as though it just started, and yet in just over six weeks I’ll be moved into my apartment in Norman and getting settled in for another school year and a great year of Oklahoma baseball. As of this past Tuesday, Abegale and I have been officially dating for one year, which is crazy to think back on — I still remember the first time I drove from Norman to Lubbock, last September, as though it were yesterday. It’s been an amazing year for us, and we’re looking forward to another.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this:
search previous next tag category expand menu location phone mail time cart zoom edit close